Ipsos - Australians believe globalisation is good (with qualifications)

As the world's G-20 leaders gather in Toronto, Canada for their meeting, a majority of consumers globally believe that globalisation and expanded trade are good, and that investment by foreign companies is essential for growth and expansion, a new Ipsos/canada.com poll has found.

Australians were decidedly more sceptical than other countries of foreign investment in their country, the level of influence and power foreign corporations exerted and the ability for CEOs to tell the truth.
However, Australians were significantly more positive about our economy, that Australia was heading in the right direction and were more confident than the global average about their own job security.
"This study highlights the relative optimism of Australians when it comes to their own economy and their perceptions of the direction in which Australia is headed, compared to many other of the 24 countries surveyed. On the whole we found that the emerging economies of Asia Pacific and Latin America were also more confident than more established Western nations," Ipsos Public Affairs Managing Director Ben Barnes said.
"However it is interesting to note that Australians have a more cautious view of key areas such as foreign investment and the power large companies wield, as well as corporate governance."
Two thirds of Australians said that overall globalisation was good, which was on par with the global average but well behind China, where 92 per cent of the population agreed with the statement.
More than half (59 per cent of Australians) said their government should restrict investment by foreign companies in their country even if it means fewer jobs will be created. This compared to 39 per cent of global citizens.
A majority of global citizens (69 per cent) and 75 per cent of Australians believe that large or foreign corporations are more powerful than governments—and hold too much influence over their own. Only 24 per cent of Australians think that corporate CEOs tell the truth, compared to 35 per cent globally.
Almost three-quarters of Australians believe their government should have complete access to the private information of corporations doing business in their country and 86 per cent believe government should be more aggressive regulating activities of national and multinational corporations.
The global consumer/citizen survey, conducted by Ipsos in May, 2010 contained interviews with 18,624 adults in 24 countries, including Australia, and representing 75 per cent of the world's GNP.
The study also highlighted different nations' views on the economy, their country's future and job security including:
Almost three quarters of Australians described the current economic situation in their country as 'good', compared to just 39 per cent of global citizens
43 per cent of Australians say things in their country are on the wrong track, compared to 61 per cent of global citizens
63 per cent of Australians are satisfied with the way things are going in their country today, compared to 35 per cent of global citizens
More than half (55 per cent) of Australians rate the current state of the economy in their local area as "Strong" compared to just 30 per cent of global citizens BUT only 34 per cent of Australians expect their local economy to be stronger six months from now compared to 31 per cent of global citizens
Almost half (48 per cent) of Australians indicate they're now less confident about job security for themselves, their family and other people they know personally compared to how they felt six months ago, compared to 58 per cent of global

As the world's G-20 leaders gather in Toronto, Canada for their meeting, a majority of consumers globally believe that globalisation and expanded trade are good, and that investment by foreign companies is essential for growth and expansion, a new Ipsos/canada.com poll has found.

Australians were decidedly more sceptical than other countries of foreign investment in their country, the level of influence and power foreign corporations exerted and the ability for CEOs to tell the truth.

However, Australians were significantly more positive about our economy, that Australia was heading in the right direction and were more confident than the global average about their own job security.

"This study highlights the relative optimism of Australians when it comes to their own economy and their perceptions of the direction in which Australia is headed, compared to many other of the 24 countries surveyed. On the whole we found that the emerging economies of Asia Pacific and Latin America were also more confident than more established Western nations," Ipsos Public Affairs

Managing Director Ben Barnes said.

"However it is interesting to note that Australians have a more cautious view of key areas such as foreign investment and the power large companies wield, as well as corporate governance."

Two thirds of Australians said that overall globalisation was good, which was on par with the global average but well behind China, where 92 per cent of the population agreed with the statement.

More than half (59 per cent of Australians) said their government should restrict investment by foreign companies in their country even if it means fewer jobs will be created. This compared to 39 per cent of global citizens.

A majority of global citizens (69 per cent) and 75 per cent of Australians believe that large or foreign corporations are more powerful than governments—and hold too much influence over their own.

Only 24 per cent of Australians think that corporate CEOs tell the truth, compared to 35 per cent globally.

Almost three-quarters of Australians believe their government should have complete access to the private information of corporations doing business in their country and 86 per cent believe government should be more aggressive regulating activities of national and multinational corporations.

The global consumer/citizen survey, conducted by Ipsos in May, 2010 contained interviews with 18,624 adults in 24 countries, including Australia, and representing 75 per cent of the world's GNP.

The study also highlighted different nations' views on the economy, their country's future and job security including:

  • Almost three quarters of Australians described the current economic situation in their country as 'good', compared to just 39 per cent of global citizens

  • 43 per cent of Australians say things in their country are on the wrong track, compared to 61 per cent of global citizens

  • 63 per cent of Australians are satisfied with the way things are going in their country today, compared to 35 per cent of global citizens

  • More than half (55 per cent) of Australians rate the current state of the economy in their local area as "Strong" compared to just 30 per cent of global citizens

  • BUT only 34 per cent of Australians expect their local economy to be stronger six months from now compared to 31 per cent of global citizens

Almost half (48 per cent) of Australians indicate they're now less confident about job security for themselves, their family and other people they know personally compared to how they felt six months ago, compared to 58 per cent of global.

Media release July 1, 2010. For further information Amanda Ross  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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